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Fuel Filter Replacement for Model Year 2000 (and later) Hummers:

Tried to change my fuel filter for the 1st time tonight and ran into problem. I asked the list a month or so ago about how easy it was and was assured it was simply unscrew hold down cap, insert new filter and re-tighten cap and bleed and done. Not so easy, as I am finding out... 1st off, plastic hold down cap is so tight, had to use an improvised oil filter wrench in such a tight spot that my hands are all cut. Also, new filter must be inserted only one way, and if not marked on the outside, is so hard to seat. Also, putting the hold on cap back on is impossibe by hand and even after using the makeshift oil filter wrench I still can't tighten it enough to stop the leak when cranked.
I am going to try to shop tomorrow for perhaps some type of cap wrench or some type of tool to help me.. Does anyone know of any? Is it something only the dealers have?
What did I do wrong? Wow, did I screw up something that should of been so easy?

Gerard 2000 TD wagon

Hi Gerard......

Just the first time......you'll get used to it. The filter canister on the 2K trucks is a little more cramped than previous ones....at least a little more cramped than the filter on my previous '95 truck.

I just changed my filter as part of my 6000 mile service on the 2K beast. The best 'wrench' that I've found is a 'strap' type oil filter wrench. It's just a black strap roughly about 1" wide, with a plastic handle. One end is permanently attached to the handle, the other end slides into a slot on the handle. The handle tightens up on the strap when turned......makes removing the retaining ring much easier.....it can work at the odd angle that's required due to all the 'stuff' that's around and near the canister.

On the slots in the filter......there's one wide slot that fits over the wide 'tooth' on the canister. I usually place my right thumb over the wide slot so I know where it's at once it's turned upside down and no longer visible. You can also mark the edges of the wide slot with a magic marker on top of the filter if needed to help line it up. (Just don't push down and try to seat the filter till you're sure it's lined up correctly.)

On tightening the ring.....I've found on both of my trucks that a good 'hand-tightening' is all that's required though I may snug it down just slightly with the strap. I've had no leaking problems either way.

Another observation on bleeding the filter on the 2K truck versus the '95 model......I've noticed when I turn the ignition key on the lift pump starts, at least for a few seconds. I was able to bleed the air out the top cap successfully without even turning the engine (or jumping the wires as on the 95). I just cycled the pump on a few times with the key while bleeding and it went fine. Probably easier with two people but definitely 'doable' by oneself......I was alone when I did mine.

On yours being down due to leaking......could be that if you've fiddled with it too much that you've damaged the thin rubber sealing ring just under the top of the filter itself. If so, best bet is to just start over with another new filter.

Rick Crider (lurking now but still very much here....)
Monroe NC
2K White Wagon


If the ring won't come off, place a flat screwdriver or a punch on one of the fins and gently tap until it loosens a bit. It's plastic, so you need to be careful, but this method works fine in my experience. Once it's loosened, remove by hand. The only time I've ever had to tap it off is when someone else put it on.

You can place your thumb over the wide slot on the filter as a means of properly registering it. Some have found it useful to mark the center of the wide slot on the outside of the filter with a Sharpie or other marker.

It should not need to be more than hand tight. It if leaks after hand-tightening, you've done something wrong. Either it's not registered properly, not fully seated, or the seal has been damaged. Under no circumstances would I try to tighten it further if it were leaking when hand tight. Take it apart, fix it if necessary, and re-install it. Note that it's a tremendous PITA to "fix" the seal if it's come apart, but it can be done if you're patient and you value $14 more than your time and your sanity.

Doug


When you seat the new filter, you need to make sure it goes in smoothly. It is very easy to damage the thin aluminum ridge the holds the o-ring in place. The retaining ring only needs to be hand tight if the o-ring is not damaged.

-william

ps - I ruined one recently, and I have changed quite a few of them.


I just recently changed mine. It's really really really easy on a 2000. Here's how to do it:

  1. Turn the engine off obviously
  2. Loosen the two screws that hold the CTIS compressor in place.
  3. Move the CTIS compresser forward towards the radiators to give yourself room. The silver cylinder with a black round cap in the center is the fuel filter assembly.
  4. Unscrew the black cap that encircles the entire assembly. If it's really tough to turn just use a screwdrive and a hammer to loosen it a bit.
  5. Remove the fuel filter element. (Dirth isn't it?)
  6. Look at the new fuel filter to put in. Notice if you turn it upside down that one of the holes is larger than the rest? That one goes towards the front of the Hummer (towards the radiators). Some fuel filters are even labeled with a "FRONT" stamp.
  7. Slowly put the fuel filter in. It doesn't turn or twist, just goes straight in. Remember to put the front towards the front or it won't work.
  8. Re-tighten the outer most black cap.
  9. Try starting the engine. If it starts in the first 3 tries, cool. If it doesn't start, then just loosen the very top black cap 1/4 turn and try starting the engine again. Soon as the engine starts, turn it off. Retighten the black cap.
  10. You are done.

-Ben


See added notes interspersed in the following procedure:

> 1.) Turn the engine off obviously
> 2.) Loosen the two screws that hold the CTIS compressor in place.
> 3.) Move the CTIS compresser forward towards the radiators to give 
>     yourself room.  The silver cylinder with a black round cap in 
>     the center is the fuel filter assembly.
> 4.) Unscrew the black cap that encircles the entire assembly.  If 
>     it's really tough to turn just use a screwdrive and a hammer to 
>     loosen it a bit.

Aieee. Careful here. That "black cap" is just a plastic ring and it has been known to break. At least you can ORDER a replacement from your local Hummer or GM dealer, but you don't want you vehicle down due to this trite inconvenience (many, if not most, dealers do not stock this part).

> 5.) Remove the fuel filter element.  (Dirth isn't it?)

Use the following procedure:

  1. Open the top vent and then drain fuel from filter, using the water drain by the left front tire.
  2. Remove the old fuel filter element. You will need to pull it straight up to start.
  3. Clean around the retaining ring and top of filter housing.

> 6.) Look at the new fuel filter to put in.  Notice if you turn it 
>     upside down that one of the holes is larger than the rest?  
>     That one goes towards the front of the Hummer (towards the 
>     radiators).  Some fuel filters are even labeled with a 
>     "FRONT" stamp.

Make certain that the top vent on the new filter is open.

> 7.) Slowly put the fuel filter in.  It doesn't turn or twist, 
>     just goes straight in.  Remember to put the front towards the 
>     front or it won't work.

Carefully inspect to see that the filter is seated properly on the filter housing. If it is incorrectly seated, it is impossible to tighten the filter ring properly and will leave you with a significant fuel leak.

> 8.) Re-tighten the outer most black cap.

  1. Tighten the filter ring BY HAND, being careful to not cross-thread the filter ring.
  2. Disconnect fuel pump leads at connector, and check leads using an ohm meter to ground to verify which pin to apply power to.
  3. Hot-wire the fuel pump to purge the air from the filter. Use a rag to cover the air vent on top of the filter and close when fuel starts to soak the rag. See the HID for methods to hot-wire the fuel pump.
  4. Retighten the filter ring, again, BY HAND.
  5. Reconnect the fuel pump leads.
  6. Return the CTIS pump to the correct position and tighten the screws to hold the pump in place.

> 9.) Try starting the engine.  If it starts in the first 3 tries, 
>     cool.  If it doesn't start, then just loosen the very top black 
>     cap 1/4 turn and try starting the engine again.  Soon as the 
>     engine starts, turn it off.  Retighten the black cap.
> 10.) You are done.


> 4.) Unscrew the black cap that encircles the entire assembly.  If it's
> really tough to turn just use a screwdriver and a hammer to loosen
> it a bit.

I'd suggest that you use this method (hammer and screwdriver) as a last resort. A small strap wrench (NOT a Vise-Grip® chain wrench) will work much better. If you can't find a small strap wrench possibly an oil filter wrench for an import car (smaller diameter filters) will work but I haven't tried one of these on the Hummer fuel filter. It also wouldn't hurt to clean the exterior of the filter BEFORE you open it up. Removing any caked-on mud or dirt will lessen the chance of contaminating the system when the cap comes off.

Also do not leave the filter open (cap removed) without covering the top with a clean rag or similar method of keeping foreign material out of the filter, especially if you are performing a field repair. You never know when a gust of wind will blow some sand or other injector clogging crud into your fuel system if you leave its heart open to the atmosphere unguarded.


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